Apple Juice & Barbeques

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MORE SQUEEZINS' Richard Taylor of Seattle would like to "chercher le petit b괥 (nitpick)" about our description of the ciderapple brandy beverage called pommeau in

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Apple Juice & Barbeques

  • Apple Juice & Barbeques

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    MORE SQUEEZINS' Richard Taylor of Seattle would like to "chercher le petit b괥 (nitpick)" about our description of the ciderapple brandy beverage called pommeau in our March 19 issue ("It's Apple, Jack"). "Pommeau (in France, at least) is a mixture of two-thirds mout de pomme (unfermented apple juice) and one-third Calvados (apple brandy) of about 3 years of age (for a strong taste). After bottling, time must elapse before it is considered ready to drink. In France, this drink is served slightly cool (cellar temperature) as an aperitif. Although all these drinks are available commercially, the best are homemade and a source of pride when well done." BREAK OUT THE LIGHTER FLUID, PA! The days are longer, pollen is in the air, Little League is starting up . . . and all across America, the scent of wood smoke can be sniffed on the breeze. On Saturday, April 12, barbecue can be found on public television as well: KCTS will air a series titled "Barbeque America: A pilgrimage in search of America's best barbeque." In 13 episodes, host Rick Browne will travel from Georgia to California, from Maine to Texas, from Tennessee to . . . Woodinville? That's right—one episode will feature local grilled salmon, along with a lesson in cedar plank cooking from Sea Star Restaurant. Besides getting demonstrations from renowned barbecue chefs, visit barbecue championships across the nation and learn trivia like the difference between wet and dry pork ribs. By the end of the series, you'll be itching to go out and do some backyard grilling of your own. Airs Saturdays at 2:30 p.m. on KCTS Channel 9. AND THE WINNERS ARE: Forty sippers, 120 wines, and innumerable succulent Kumamoto oysters later, the results are in on the ninth annual Pacific Coast Oyster Wine Competition. This year's competition was so close that 11 wines had to be named rather than the usual 10. Though Idaho and British Columbia were eligible to compete, only wines from the three coastal U.S. states placed. Here's the breakdown by state; asterisks denote wines that have topped the chart before. Retail prices are approximate. Washington:

    Chateau Ste. Michelle 2002 pinot gris, $10

    Columbia Crest 2000 sauvignon blanc, $7*

    Columbia Winery 2001 pinot gris, $10

    Snoqualmie Winery 2001 sauvignon blanc, $7* Oregon:

    Oak Knoll Winery 2001 pinot gris, $10* California:

    Canyon Road Winery 2002 sauvignon blanc, $9

    Dry Creek Vineyard 2002 dry chenin blanc, $9*

    Geyser Peak Winery 2002 sauvignon blanc, $10*

    La Famiglia di Robert Mondavi 2001 pinot grigio, $14

    Martin & Weyrich Winery 2001 Huerhueno chardonnay, $10

    Parducci Wine Cellars 2002 sauvignon blanc, $7.50 For technical data on the winning wines and other information on the Pacific Coast Oyster Wine Competition or competition sponsor Taylor Shellfish Farms, visit www.taylorshellfish.com after April 9 or contact Jon Rowley at 206-283-7566 or rowley@nwlink.com. Food and/or beverage news? E-mail Hot Dish at food@seattleweekly.com

     
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