Cut Out the Middle Guy!

Don't wait for us to tell you about the latest restaurant opening, the newest menu, the spiffiest wine tasting; get your flack straight from the source! Ace publicist Tamara Wilson invites all interested individuals to sign up to receive food news from her P.R. firm as it happens. Just go to www.tamarawilson.com/12.html, fill in the form, note your particular interests (restaurant, retail, charitable events, nightlife, etc.), and "Join the Party!" LET THEM EAT PASTA A staple in the Market for years, many were saddened when DeLaurenti's closed. Albeit, it was only for a monthto remodeland everyone's happy they're back and better than ever. You walk through the original entrance on First Avenue and are surrounded by people shouting their orders and clamoring for espresso in the renovated cafe space. Try one of the fresh, perfectly grilled panini and get a pleasant surprisea mini-dish of house olives on the side. Take it to the counter and watch as tourists ogle the Market. Then get your shopping done: DeLaurenti's carries Spanish boquarones (tiny marinated fish), dolmas, calamari salad, peppadew peppers, dozens of cheeses and deli meats, over 25 varieties of olivesand that's only in one display case. They also have shelves of oils, vinegars, and sauces, of Finnish rye crisps, Italian cookies, Irish oatmeal, Mexican chocolate, Swiss yogurt, fresh mayo, house pasta and pasta sauces . . . the list goes on and on. Take a cursory look at the wines upstairs or, if you have several hours to spare, check out every bottle. Grocery shopping may seem like a chore when it's done at Safeway, but at DeLaurenti's, it's a luxury. ROSIE BOWKER THE WRITE STUFF Not many people can both cook and write about cooking. If you aspire to be one of that select few, study the artcooktop to laptopwith a local master: Greg Atkinson, food columnist for Pacific magazine and chef at Paul and Debbie Brainerd's idyllic Eco-Walden settlement IslandWood on Bainbridge Island. It's both intensive and expensive (consuming the better part of two days and a $250 tuition), but it's a rare chance to practice getting down on paper "the nebulous desire to make something wonderful" in the kitchen. March 27 and 28. Tuition includes meals and overnight accommodations. Learn more about the program atwww.islandwood.org/programscom_cuisine.asp#poetry. Registration 206-855-4300. Food and/or beverage news? E-mail Hot Dish at mailto:food@seattleweekly.com

 
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