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To encourage us all to think globally but drink locally, the Washington Wine Commission has issued its first-ever awards to restaurants that emphasize Washington wines. Some of the establishments cited: The Barking Frog at Willows Lodge, Woodinville (in the fine-dining category); The Georgian Room of the Olympic Four Seasons (hotel category); and two out-of-towners in bistro/caf頣ategory: Yakima's Barrel House and the Valley Caf頩n Ellensburg. THAT'S THE WAY THE COOKIE CRUMBLES Ah, the beginning of spring. Birds chirping. Buds growing. And Girl Scouts, tempting innocents with Do-Si-Dos and Thin Mints. (Caption on a Web site pic of scouts holding bags of cookies: "Resistance Is Futile."). The site, www.girlscoutstotem.org/Cookies/cookies.htm, also features ways to incorporate Girl Scout cookies into your diet once you've had your fill of eating them straight from the box. Try the "Iced Illusion," a bar cookie with icing made using crushed Aloha Chip cookies (macadamia nut and white chocolate), crushed pecans, and raisins. Or the Southern Peanut Butter pie: make a crust out of ground Tagalongs (peanut butter patties) and fill it with peanut butter, vanilla pudding mix, and milk. Cookies will be sold in front of many major grocery chains, drug stores, state ferry docks, and locations downtown. The sale will take place from Feb. 28 to March 16. EATS TIMES THREE He's neither lean nor mean, but a culinary machine for sure is Luigi Denunzio; not content with operating the Caf頂engodi on First Avenue and Luigi's Grotto just around the corner on Cherry Street, he's opening another Pioneer Square eatery this week. Situated at 106 James St., Brindisi (accent on the first syllable: It means "drinking song" in Italian) will offer a monthly change of menu, making a tour of the cuisines of Italy's provinces every 11 months. (The 12th will focus on Italian-American specialties). PICTURE PERFECT When it comes to food magazines, we favor the kind that devote more space to food than to rural inns in Umbria and sightseeing in Sumatra. The no-frills (and no-ads) Cooks Illustrated approach has long been our ideal. But there's nothing wrong with lively layout and snazzy color photographs in a good cause, and we confess to a growing affection for Taunton Press' bimonthly Fine Cooking. Every 80-page issue is chock-full of sensible but imaginative recipes appetizingly illustrated, useful equipment reviews, and cool prep tips (we now know how to slice fennel without wasting half the bulb). Best of all, there's a four-page ready-to-clip set of the issue's top recipes designed to slip into a three-ring binder. Check them out at www.finecooking.com. A year's subscription (seven issues) is currently going for $29.95. Food and/or beverage news? E-mail Hot Dish at food@seattleweekly.com.

 
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