THELMA & LOUISE

MGM Home Entertainment, $24.98

A MUST FOR any lover of movies or men or women, this special edition of the 1991 female-desperado

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Thelma and Louise

THELMA & LOUISE

MGM Home Entertainment, $24.98

A MUST FOR any lover of movies or men or women, this special edition of the 1991 female-desperado classic is insightful, exhilarating, and as gorgeous as its sex object, newcomer Brad Pitt (who, we learn, did not even visit a gym to achieve that incredible belly he bumps with Thelma!). The adventure amply rewards a second viewing on this single-disc set (arriving Feb. 4). Debutant Callie Khouri kept her impeccable, Oscar-winning script safe from executives (who said, "What is this about? Two bitches in a car?") and demanded a happy ending and no killing by its heroines. Director Ridley Scott, eager to do a film about actual humans after Alien and Blade Runner, made a masterpiece of the American landscape. Geena Davis and Susan Sarandon were never more immortal.

Scott gives the better of the two commentary tracks. He explains why Sarandon's sex scene was cut, but on the three women's combined commentary track, Khouri says she didn't write the scene. (Sarandon also says Scott wouldn't let her kiss Davis in the last scene.) Among other extras, my favorite stuff concerns the alternate ending of the famous finale. It's spectacular to watch that T-bird fall 1,500 to 2,000 feet and interesting to hear why we don't see it on film. The $16.5 million budget was used up, the sun was about to set on the last major shooting day, and they had two takes—you couldn't get that feel with CGI.

The only thing missing from this DVD: the outtakes from the once-far-longer Pitt sex scene, for which Scott personally sprayed Evian water all over Pitt's stomach while poor Davis was protesting, "I'm in the scene, too! I'm the girl!"

Tim Appelo

LOOK FOR MORE deleted scenes in Ghost World, which also includes the crazy Hindi-language music video that opens the film. Also out Feb. 4, Burr Steers' acidly witty Igby Goes Down, which made its world premiere at SIFF '02 (Steers and star Kieran Culkin do commentaries). The drag documentary The Cockettes is worth a look, as is the original 1957 An Affair to Remember. Among seasonal dreck, Samuel L. Jackson wears a kilt in Formula 51, and Patrick Swayze kicks ass in the 1989 guilty pleasure Road House.

B.R.M.

bmiller@seattleweekly.com

 
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