Just when you're settling comfortably into your People magazine to relish the pathetic state of J.Lo's love life, you find out you're supposed to be

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Remembrance of Things Past

Just when you're settling comfortably into your People magazine to relish the pathetic state of J.Lo's love life, you find out you're supposed to be "post-gay."

For the uninitiated (or those smart enough to keep their heads clear of all allegedly compelling queer social movements), "post-gay" is the theory that homosexuals are over the whole gay thing. Why label? Why fuss? Why keep watching The Wizard of Oz when we've moved way over that rainbow into the mainstream and can be respectable bankers or, better, work at deconstructing the pyramid of stereotypes and start screwing straight rock stars? Next thing you know, they'll be telling us that no dykes may enjoy Cagney & Lacey and that you should feel ashamed if you even think of using your DVD's frame-by-frame function when Matt Damon gets out of the bathtub in The Talented Mr. Ripley. This is progress?

History is, we hope, a force that moves with us—scolding, reminding, entertaining. Even if some of our past reveals only the stunning capacity to have a relatively meaningless good time, isn't that something to hang onto in a culture that sustains Touched by an Angel? Moreover, before we claim our victory flag of social visibility, we should recall that battles remain to be won in wars that are far from over.

Forward movement is a grand plan. For Pride 2002, we look ahead with the awareness that we're not yet done with what's been left behind. Deconstruction sounds fine, as long as we remember which pieces we'll need when it comes time to put the whole damn thing back together again.

Steve Wiecking

 
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