"I have yet to read a sports article that extols the virtues of Michael Jordan's sexy ass and bubbly personality."

A MOM, A FRIEND, A HERO

Does anyone believe that a murder is right? If you do . . . I don't know what to say. Someone killed my mom, Donna G. O'Steen ["A Killing in the Neighborhood," May 30]. This is coming from me, an 11-year-old girl that lost a mom, a friend, a hero to a murder. Who would do such a horrible thing? This is a person who would stand up for what was right! A person you wouldn't want to mess with when she believed something that you disagreed with. A mom, aunt, cousin, and a friend to many people. Donna O'Steen was a strong, beautiful person. Moulin Rouge was one of her favorite movies. They have a saying in that movie. She fits it so much! The saying was "truth, joy, beauty, but most of all love." She had, and was, all these things.

My family (Kealan, Rich, and me) has experienced so much pain. But Donna's friends and our own friends have been so wonderful! My friends have been very supporting. I am saying this from my heart. I miss my mother so bad. She was the best mom ever! Some of my friends—Sarah, Ellia, and Cherri—were in our school counseling for hours after they found out the news. I returned to school the following Monday and experienced a thrill I will never forget. I walked in my class and they stood up clapping, cheering, some even crying! I didn't realize my classmates cared so much about me!

My mother was my hero, my role model. She was a high-spirited person. She should be here walking around, talking to me or her sister Shirley or Kim, her loyal friend. She is among us, but not quite the way she should be. There is one reason only for this unfair punishment—she was picked by a crazy person to loose a life.

Morgan Haynie

Seattle

WILL FANS MIGRATE WITH BIRD?

As a Connecticut resident and a faithful UConn women's basketball follower, I was very pleased to read the article on Sue Bird ["Eye of the Storm," June 6]. UConn women's basketball is the rage here (more so even than men's), and everyone is anxious to keep up with the "Fab Four" now that they've moved on to the pros. If the WNBA had nothing but UConn fans, they wouldn't have to worry about attendance and the future of the league. Games [here] are always a sellout. Maybe Sue Bird will bring this to Seattle.

Beverly Metcalf

Manchester, CT

THIS AIN'T MISS AMERICA

Society views star athletes as role models, and as an industry, women's sports is in the rookie stages of the process. Sports journalism, however, is an institution—one governed by the rules of the society that built it. And Matt Villano is no maverick; his treatment of the Sue Bird story was just plain predictable ["Eye of the Storm," June 6]. Bird is a professional athlete, not a Miss America contestant. Villano's constant references to Bird's looks as one of her assets was sexist and irresponsible. He could have just made the point and actually spoken to the issue, rather than exacerbating the problem. The WNBA has a huge job marketing female players without the Sports Illustrated bathing suit issue mentality. It's difficult because women are primarily judged as valuable based on how high we score on the titillation scale. Bird was born with "Bette Davis eyes" and a "bedazzling" appearance; she has worked, sacrificed, and honed her ability on the court. The implied story was Bird's game and career [and] how the WNBA plans to market her. Villano lay the girl-vixen thing on too thick. The real story was hidden behind a basketball pinup story. Enough already. I have yet to read a sports article that extols the virtues of Michael Jordan's sexy ass and bubbly personality. Spare us. Good luck, Sue; there are those of us who think it should be all about your game.

Tess. Lotta

via e-mail

SALMON OFF THE BARBIE

Barbecuing is the slow, indirect cooking of cheap and "undesirable" cuts of meat over a low wood fire. Flavor comes from (1) the smoke, (2) the savory meat itself, and (3) a dry spice rub and/or sauce. The sauce should have notes of vinegar, tomato, sweetness, and heat, with no one element predominating. Barbecuing is ideal for tough, fatty cuts like beef brisket, pork butt, and ribs—transforming what would otherwise be virtually inedible into a real treat. Barbecuing is not suitable for lean and tender cuts of lamb or poultry or anything else. It is certainly not suitable for Copper River salmon.

Sounds like what [Roger Downey] experienced was a typical California-style travesty [Side Dish, "Discomfort Food," June 6]. My suggestion: Enjoy the incredible native bounty of the Pacific Northwest cooked as it should be, and leave the barbecuing to cow country (or to those of us who grew up there).

Lindsey Godfrey

via e-mail

JUST THE FACTS, PLEASE

Michael A. Stusser obviously did not check his sources nor verify some key facts cited in his article "Fallen Starr" [May 30].

Rabbi Starr was not "stripped of his emeritus status"; he resigned. If he'd asked, Stusser might have discovered that there is a petition circulating among the temple congregants to deny this resignation and reinstate Rabbi Starr's emeritus status.

Likewise, Rabbi Starr did not "run off to Phoenix, in declining health"; the rabbi and his wife are still living in the house where they have lived for more than 30 years. I was there a few days ago, and there were no signs of moving boxes. It is no secret that Rabbi Starr retired last year and has planned to move from Seattle for quite some time. It is also well known that the rabbi had cancer-related surgery two years ago, but I played tennis with him recently and he ran me ragged—we all should be in such declining health at 71!

Stusser states that " . . . no one believes Starr gave away anything near 400 grand to those in need—unless you count Phil Smart. . . . " Rabbi Starr has never purchased a vehicle from Phil Smart—[not] even the Mercedes he purchased with retirement gift money (from congregants).

Do Michael Stusser and the Weekly have journalistic integrity, or are they just a "wanna-be" journalist and another sensational rag? I can get rumors on the street (or from temple)—please print the facts!

Dawna Hoerle

via e-mail

NOT TRUE!

Thanks to Roger Downey for covering the subculture of scientific dissidents on Darwinism ["Not the Whole Truth," May 16]. Downey did, however, mischaracterize some key issues:

He writes that former Burlington biology teacher [Roger] DeHart "had been omitting certain chapters" regarding Darwinian theory. This is false. DeHart always taught the curriculum and only wanted to add articles from Nature, American Biology Teacher, and The Boston Globe. These articles pointed out that items in the textbooks were "phony," to quote the late, great Stephan Jay Gould.

Downey writes that the Discovery Institute "tried to organize a campaign" to elect Burlington school boarders. This is also false. Though I would have gladly gone and waved signs for candidates, the fact is we did nothing.

Finally, though he defends the other "icons," Downey rightly admits that Ernst Haeckel's drawings [making the early development of distant species look more similar] are fudged. This should cause alarm, but Downey opens fire on the messenger. Yikes!

I like Downey, and stories like this were made for anti-establishment places like the Weekly. Let's see more, but lets see it fair and accurate; after all, isn't that only American?

Mark Edwards

Media Guy, Discovery Institute

It's the American way! Write to Seattle Weekly, 1008 Western, Ste. 300, Seattle, WA 98104; fax to 206-467-4377; or e-mail to letters@seattleweekly.com. By submission of a letter, you agree that we may edit the letter and publish and/or license the publication of it in print, electronically, and for archival purposes. Please include name, location, and phone number.

 
comments powered by Disqus