Rocket rocked; Cell Square sold; I-Spy hot.

The End's local Young and the Restless show was up to its naughty tricks again last weekend. The Sunday night program broadcast the new Sunny Day Real Estate album, The Rising Tide, which doesn't hit stores until June 20, in its entirety. The Gnome had already heard the new disc anyway and at first thought it sounded like vintage . . . Journey. But a few listens in and it's a-growin' on your hard-working correspondent. Oh, and the record's not on Sub Pop. After some finagling and visits to the accountant, the label and Sunny Day have parted ways; The Rising Tide will come out on BMG-affiliated SoCal label Time Bomb. The title doesn't make a sly reference to the band's emo roots by the way, but alludes to the searing political commentary penned by Jeremy Enigk and guitarist Dan Hoerner. A few years back, Hoerner bought about 40 acres of land in Eastern Washington to save it from loggers, and he's become a harsh critic of the urban lifestyle. No word on whether Sunny Day's new tour bus will be an eco-friendly gas-electric hybrid.

The Gnome's got some advice for antiperspirant manufacturers. Consider a sponsorship deal with I-Spy's weekly Saturday dance night Lickit! On an already muggy evening, French DJ Alex Gopher's set turned the joint into a full-on sweatbox, even though the man behind "Party People" mostly stuck to standard house tracks.

Seattle's oldest music publication ain't dead yet. The Rocket's looked more like a ping-pong ball in recent weeks, as rumors circulated that the 21-year-old biweekly had been sold. Representatives from Portland's Willamette Week seemed to have bought it—they even came here to meet with Rocket staffers—intending to turn the Portland version into a weekly competitor with the Stranger's new Rose City 'zine, The Mercury. But the WW folks weren't sure what to do with the Seattle edition; turning it into a weekly here would have had WW papers competing with the Seattle-based Stranger on two fronts. (Talk about a battle of the Titans!) Now word has it that WW has pulled out of the Rocket deal altogether. Another I-5 deal did go down. Monday, Portland's Djangos.com announced it had bought Cellophane Square's four Washington stores for an undisclosed sum. Djangos.com operates retail stores as well as an e-commerce site.

In venue news, Seattle's oldest bar, the 112-year-old Jules Maes, will be shut down in early June. There'll be a few more shows in the backroom before this page in Seattle history is turned, so stop in at the Georgetown haunt before it's too late. In happier news, some of the friendly folks behind the Tractor and Al's Tavern will open a new bar with nightly music, the Sunset Tavern. It comes to Ballard soon, just as all good things come to Ballard. You betcha!

You can reach the Metro Gnome at metrognome@seattleweekly.com

 
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