After a long wait and a whole lotta anticipation, all of Seattle's entertainment press stumbled on February 22—including the Weekly. That's the day Bloodshot released

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Love as Laughter spits; Desmemberment Plan does Juvenile.

After a long wait and a whole lotta anticipation, all of Seattle's entertainment press stumbled on February 22—including the Weekly. That's the day Bloodshot released Neko Case's first new album in four years, the masterful Furnace Room Lullaby. Fortunately for this surging talent, a born-and-raised Washingtonian, the national press took note. April's CMJ New Music Monthly features Case on the cover, in a story written by the Weekly's own Kristy Ojala, while USA Today, Entertainment Weekly, and others lined up to praise the disc. As well they should: Case's confident vocals and mix of country, folk, and rock makes for a swingin' party, and her backing band—collectively known as the Boyfriends— features such luminaries as John Ramberg of the Model Rockets, Ron Sexsmith, and Kelly Hogan. The Gnome loves ya, Neko.

And how 'bout them Model Rockets? The clandestine crew rocked cozy Al's Tavern in Wallingford Saturday night, playing a 30-song set of '50s and '60s favorites like the Platters' "Twilight Time" and the Who's "So Sad About Us." Despite the cramped quarters, the crowd danced and swilled cheap beer in harmony, which is more than the Gnome can say for the other busy shows 'round town last weekend.

Like the Love As Laughter and Les Savy Fav gig at Sit & Spin Friday night. Toward the end of a buzzing yet lo-NRG set, LAL's Sam Jayne sought retribution against a glass-hurling audience member by throwing a full glass of mystery liquid at the crowd. Problem is, Sam doused the Gnome, who decidedly doesn't like becoming wet during rock shows. Fortunately, Brooklyn's Les Savy Fav washed away the dull taste left by LAL's set. First, the quartet launched into a tongue-in-cheek rawk take on the Moby hit "Bodyrock," then the horribly bearded vocalist Tim Harrington rambled on about how they'd played an all-ages show earlier and since this was an adults-only show, he felt compelled to take off his shirt. Besides revealing a flabby torso, ol' Tim had covered his nipples with red electrical tape.

Though no nipples were involved, DC's the Dismemberment Plan also obliged the kids and the 21-and-over crowd by playing two shows at the Crocodile on Saturday. And the emo faves had an offbeat cover up their sleeves: Juvenile's "Back that Azz Up." The later, adult show wasn't a complete success. The affable band left off its set list the one song many in the audience knew—"What Do You Want Me to Say," which has received heavy airplay on KCMU.

Even if they'd played it, the show of the week still belonged to Ken Stringfellow and Jon Auer, whose acoustic Posies reunion at the Showbox last Thursday shined brighter than that ridiculous Space Needle beacon. The duo's exquisite harmonies and fab pop songs have aged like fine cheese, and the Gnome and other Posies fans ate it up. You betcha!

You can reach the Metro Gnome at metrognome@seattleweekly.com

 
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